Monash University

Ivan Sanderson had already identified several areas with similar characteristics where strange phenomena rigged to large disappearances occurred. These areas were located in an area (more like circles than as triangles) in the sea of Japan and another in the sea of the experts in seafloor Norte.Estos blame the disappearances to the existence of large pockets of methane hydrates. They note the presence of ancient sites where there have been eruptions which generate enormous bubbles of methane which grow geometrically as you gain height. When the macro-burbuja reaches the surface it does that any boat that passes over completely lose their properties of buoyancy, causing the ship to sink soon and without giving the possibility to its passengers escape from the disaster. It’s simply a matter of difference in density.If the bubble is large enough and has a density sufficiently high, also reached the airspace to catch flight to aircraft crossing by its sphere of influence, also causing immediate knock-down of the unit to the bottom of the sea, without possibility of predicting them. Victims of these killer bubbles aircraft lost engines or are burned them and fall sharply to disappear without leaving any trace or track any that will allow us to deduce what has happened with them. Professor Joseph Monaghan has investigated the hypothesis with David May, of Monash University in Melbourne (Australia) and they have to work an advanced computer system to verify his theory.The program, based on the scientific principles of fluid dynamics, reproduced all the variables, including the speed of a giant bubble of methane, gas pressure and gas density and the surrounding water. Jeff Gennette has much to offer in this field.

The results impressed by their ability to explain the phenomenon.In addition, the presence of flammable methane would also explain the testimonies of many people which ensures having seen explosions or light sources on the surface and the bottom of the sea comprising that region.

Saturday, April 28th, 2018 News

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